Kenya 2017: Kenyatta urges peace ahead of general polls

On Tuesday, Kenyians goes to the polls to choose a new parliament also a new preisdent. The dispute between president Uhuru Kenyatta and Opposition candidate Raila Odinga has raised more concerns over that.

Uhuru calls for peace on Tuesday vote

“After you cast your ballot, please go home,” Kenyatta said on Monday.

“Go back to your neighbour. Regardless of where he or she comes from, their tribe, their colour or their religion. Shake their hand, share a meal and tell them ‘let us wait for the results,’ for Kenya will be here long after this general election.”

Otherwise, Odinga has praised Kenyatta by his campaing. But he raised concerns of rigging vote and claimed the deployment of at least 150,000 members of the security forces was a ploy to intimidate voters.

However, he congratulated Kenyatta on his campaign, describing him as a “worthy opponent”.

“May the stronger candidate win tomorrow,” he said.

Conclusion: Vote in Peace, Kenyians.

 

US: House of representatives approves new sanctions to Russia

The ties between Russia and US has new low today.  US’ House of Representatives has approved a new bill which tightens sanctions againts Iran, North Korea and Russia by 419 to 3.

It needs to be passed through the Senate before it can be sent on to the president to be signed.

The White House says it is reviewing the bill, and it is unclear whether the president will veto it.

“While the president supports tough sanctions on North Korea, Iran and Russia, the White House is reviewing the House legislation and awaits a final legislative package for the president’s desk,” White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said in a statement.

Prior to the vote, Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov said such measures would plant a “dangerous mine” under the foundation of ties.

Mr Ryabkov said: “All this is very worrying. We can see no signs that that Russophobe hysteria that has engulfed the entire US Congress is dying down.”

After it passed, Russian MP Leonid Slutsky said the sanctions “undermine the prospects for the restoration of Russian-American relations and further complicate them for the foreseeable future”.

“Opportunities for diplomatic manoeuvring” are now “extremely” small, he told Russia’s Interfax news agency.

Conclusion: Further handshakes between Trump and Putin to save US-Russia ties as soon as possible,

Environment: Trump hints at climate deal shift in Paris talks

US president Donald Trump was invited by his French conuterpart Emmanuel Macron to Two-day visit to celebrates 14 July. So, both leaders has discussed environment issues like Paris climate accord in a press conference today.

Macron said he “respected” Donald Trump’s decision to pull out of the Paris climate accord but that France would remain committed.

“On climate we know what our differences are,” Macron said in Paris on Thursday, adding that it was important to move forward.

Speaking alongside Macron, Trump then hinted that the US could shift its position but failed to elaborate.

“Something could happen with respect to the Paris accord,” he said.

Trump added: “We’ll see what happens.”

Conclusion: Trump and his stubborness.

Middle East: Qatar condemns Saudi refusal to negotiate over demands

The row among Qatar and Saudi Arabia has a new chapter today. The Qatari Foreign Minister, Sheikh Mohammed al-Thani said the stance was “contrary to the principles” of international relations.

Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Bahrein and UAE has backlash Qatar by their ties with Turkey and Iran and allegations of sponsor terrorism.

US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, who has sought to resolve the crisis, acknowledged that some elements would “be very difficult for Qatar to meet”, but that there were “significant areas which provide a basis for ongoing dialogue”.

But after holding talks with Mr Tillerson in Washington on Tuesday, Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir was asked by journalists if the demands were non-negotiable. He replied: “Yes.”

“It’s very simple. We made our point. We took our steps and it’s up to the Qataris to amend their behaviour. Once they do, things will be worked out. But if they don’t, they will remain isolated,” he said.

“If Qatar wants to come back into the [Gulf Co-operation Council] pool, they know what they have to do.”

Jubeir stressed that the decision to sever ties with Qatar was made after taking into account the history of its behaviour, which he alleged included harbouring known terrorists and funding extremist groups throughout the region.

Qatar’s foreign minister, who met Mr Tillerson at the state department later on Tuesday, called the Saudi position “unacceptable”.

“This is contrary to the principles that govern international relations because you can’t just present lists of demands and refuse to negotiate,” Sheikh Mohammed was quoted as saying in a ministry statement.

Sheikh Mohammed said the US agreed the demands had to be “reasonable and actionable”, and that the allegations against Qatar also needed to be discussed.

“We agree that the State of Qatar will engage in a constructive dialogue with the parties concerned if they want to reach a solution and overcome this crisis.”

Conclusion: Call to Trump to solve it.

UK: Conservatives and Unionists reach a deal over minority government

After weeks of intense talks. British Prime Minister Theresa May stays in power after a deal between conservatives and North-Irish Unionist DUP party. Their Chief-Whips signs a pact which DUP supports a Tory minority government and issues like confidence vote and Brexit.

DUP leader and Northern Ireland First Minister Arlene Foster said the “wide-ranging” pact was “good for Northern Ireland and the UK” but one critic said it was a “straight bung”.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said the deal was “clearly not in the national interest”, and Sinn Fein’s Gerry Adams said it enabled a “Tory Brexit which threatens the Good Friday Agreement”.

Conclusion: This is a confuse and weak government lead by May.

Asia: Moon Jae-in was elected as South Korea’s president

After a inpeachment of Park Geun-Hye. South Korea held a presidential eleciton to choose a new leader. The liberal candidate Moon Jae-in was elected by 41.9% of the votes.

Son of North Korean refugees and former student leader. He was jailed for protest against dictator Park Chung-Hee. Later, Moon served in South Korean special forces.

Moon will sworn in as president on Wednesday. He vows to reshape familiar conglomerates knowns chaebols.