Middle East: Qatar condemns Saudi refusal to negotiate over demands

The row among Qatar and Saudi Arabia has a new chapter today. The Qatari Foreign Minister, Sheikh Mohammed al-Thani said the stance was “contrary to the principles” of international relations.

Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Bahrein and UAE has backlash Qatar by their ties with Turkey and Iran and allegations of sponsor terrorism.

US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, who has sought to resolve the crisis, acknowledged that some elements would “be very difficult for Qatar to meet”, but that there were “significant areas which provide a basis for ongoing dialogue”.

But after holding talks with Mr Tillerson in Washington on Tuesday, Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir was asked by journalists if the demands were non-negotiable. He replied: “Yes.”

“It’s very simple. We made our point. We took our steps and it’s up to the Qataris to amend their behaviour. Once they do, things will be worked out. But if they don’t, they will remain isolated,” he said.

“If Qatar wants to come back into the [Gulf Co-operation Council] pool, they know what they have to do.”

Jubeir stressed that the decision to sever ties with Qatar was made after taking into account the history of its behaviour, which he alleged included harbouring known terrorists and funding extremist groups throughout the region.

Qatar’s foreign minister, who met Mr Tillerson at the state department later on Tuesday, called the Saudi position “unacceptable”.

“This is contrary to the principles that govern international relations because you can’t just present lists of demands and refuse to negotiate,” Sheikh Mohammed was quoted as saying in a ministry statement.

Sheikh Mohammed said the US agreed the demands had to be “reasonable and actionable”, and that the allegations against Qatar also needed to be discussed.

“We agree that the State of Qatar will engage in a constructive dialogue with the parties concerned if they want to reach a solution and overcome this crisis.”

Conclusion: Call to Trump to solve it.

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UK: Conservatives and Unionists reach a deal over minority government

After weeks of intense talks. British Prime Minister Theresa May stays in power after a deal between conservatives and North-Irish Unionist DUP party. Their Chief-Whips signs a pact which DUP supports a Tory minority government and issues like confidence vote and Brexit.

DUP leader and Northern Ireland First Minister Arlene Foster said the “wide-ranging” pact was “good for Northern Ireland and the UK” but one critic said it was a “straight bung”.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said the deal was “clearly not in the national interest”, and Sinn Fein’s Gerry Adams said it enabled a “Tory Brexit which threatens the Good Friday Agreement”.

Conclusion: This is a confuse and weak government lead by May.

Asia: Moon Jae-in was elected as South Korea’s president

After a inpeachment of Park Geun-Hye. South Korea held a presidential eleciton to choose a new leader. The liberal candidate Moon Jae-in was elected by 41.9% of the votes.

Son of North Korean refugees and former student leader. He was jailed for protest against dictator Park Chung-Hee. Later, Moon served in South Korean special forces.

Moon will sworn in as president on Wednesday. He vows to reshape familiar conglomerates knowns chaebols.

 

UK2017: May says she’ll be ‘bloody difficult’ to Juncker

Brexit is the main issue on 2017 general election in UK.

After German newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine, the British prime minister Theresa Mat and European Commissioner Jean-Claude Juncker clashed last Wednesday at Downing Street over May’s desire to make Brexit “a success” and whether the issue of protecting the rights of expat UK and EU nationals could be agreed as early as June.

Speaking to BBC political editor Laura Kuenssberg, May said there were a lot of similarities and common ground in the two sides’ positions.

She added: “But look, I think what we’ve seen recently is that at times these negotiations are going to be tough.

“During the Conservative Party leadership campaign I was described by one of my colleagues as a bloody difficult woman. And I said at the time the next person to find that out will be Jean-Claude Juncker.”

Conclusion: This is a May way to lead with European Union.