The defeat of ANC

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South Africa: Zuma ‘sorry’ over Nkandla scandal

After the constitutional court decision over Nkandla scandal. South African president Jacob Zuma has pledge sorry to South Africans.

“The matter has caused a lot of frustration and confusion, for which I apologise,” he said in a TV address.

He said he would abide by a court ruling that he must repay government money spent on upgrading his rural home with a swimming pool and amphitheatre.

In his live address on Friday, Mr Zuma said: “I respect the judgement and will abide by it.”

The president added that he had acted “in good faith” and “never knowingly and deliberately set out to violate the constitution”.

“Any action that has been found not to be in keeping with the constitution happened because of a different approach and different legal advice,” he said, before issuing an apology for the “frustration” caused.

In reaction of it, opposition parties like EFF and Democratic Alliance urges Zuma’s resignation. But Gwede Mantashe, secretary-general of Mr Zuma’s ANC party, described the calls as an “overreaction” by the opposition.

Conclusion: Will be Zuma must gain the trust by South Africans?

South Africa: Jacob Zuma breached constitution – court decides

The constitutional court has decided the South African president Jacob Zuma to repay the upgrade of his rural home on village of Nkandla. It gave the treasury 60 days to determine how much he should repay.

The ruling is a victory for the opposition, who said they would push for Mr Zuma’s impeachment.

A government statement said he would “reflect” on the judgement and take “appropriate action”.

A spokeswoman for the governing African National Congress (ANC) said the party’s top six officials, who include Zuma and his deputy Cyril Ramaphosa, would meet to discuss the implications of the ruling, Reuters news agency reports.

Conclusion: This is South African democracy.

South Africa: ANC warns over mafia state

The Gupta scandal has another chapter today. In an interview with Bloomberg, Gwede Mantashe, the ANC secretary-general, said: “We need to deal with this; it will degenerate into a mafia state if this goes on.”

He told the BBC that South African President Jacob Zuma was not “untouchable”, but denied that the party planned to oust him.

The ANC would, however, deal with the “corporate capture” of government, Mantashe said.

Conclusion: More troubles for Zuma.

South Africa: Zuma makes U-turn over Nkandla revamp money

The Nkandla scandal has a u-turn today. South African president Jacob Zuma will pay back 23 million rands of public money used to upgrade his rural home on village of Nkandla.

Zuma’s lawyer Jeremy Gauntlett conceded in court that the report was “binding” on the president, and he was prepared to repay the money within 90 days.

However, he denied that Zuma had violated the constitution.

Opposition parts like EFF demands a impeachment of Zuma to ignore a report made by anti-corruption watchdog in 2014.

conclusion: More troubles in South Africa

South Africa: Zuma ‘will not have to repay’ money spent on residence

South African President Jacob Zuma has cleared in Nkandla residence how. He is accused by opposition to use public money to upgrade his residency. He will not have to repay state money spent to upgrade his private home in Nkandla, police minister Nathi Nhleko has said.

Nathi Nhleko said that the upgrades, including a pool costing almost 4m rand ($328,000; £215,000) were in fact security features.

Conclusion: Zuma has chanted ANC’s songs when heard this decision.