Middle East: Qatar condemns Saudi refusal to negotiate over demands

The row among Qatar and Saudi Arabia has a new chapter today. The Qatari Foreign Minister, Sheikh Mohammed al-Thani said the stance was “contrary to the principles” of international relations.

Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Bahrein and UAE has backlash Qatar by their ties with Turkey and Iran and allegations of sponsor terrorism.

US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, who has sought to resolve the crisis, acknowledged that some elements would “be very difficult for Qatar to meet”, but that there were “significant areas which provide a basis for ongoing dialogue”.

But after holding talks with Mr Tillerson in Washington on Tuesday, Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir was asked by journalists if the demands were non-negotiable. He replied: “Yes.”

“It’s very simple. We made our point. We took our steps and it’s up to the Qataris to amend their behaviour. Once they do, things will be worked out. But if they don’t, they will remain isolated,” he said.

“If Qatar wants to come back into the [Gulf Co-operation Council] pool, they know what they have to do.”

Jubeir stressed that the decision to sever ties with Qatar was made after taking into account the history of its behaviour, which he alleged included harbouring known terrorists and funding extremist groups throughout the region.

Qatar’s foreign minister, who met Mr Tillerson at the state department later on Tuesday, called the Saudi position “unacceptable”.

“This is contrary to the principles that govern international relations because you can’t just present lists of demands and refuse to negotiate,” Sheikh Mohammed was quoted as saying in a ministry statement.

Sheikh Mohammed said the US agreed the demands had to be “reasonable and actionable”, and that the allegations against Qatar also needed to be discussed.

“We agree that the State of Qatar will engage in a constructive dialogue with the parties concerned if they want to reach a solution and overcome this crisis.”

Conclusion: Call to Trump to solve it.

World Affairs: Four oil producing nations agree to freeze output

The four oil producing nations has decided to freezes their outputs. Saudi Arabia, Venezuela, Russia and Qatar rules out to tackle the fall of oil prices. Saudi Arabian oil minister Ali al-Naimi said: “Freezing now at the January level is adequate for the market. We don’t want significant gyrations in prices, we want to meet demand. We want a stable oil price.” Conclusion: Who saves that countries by the fall of oil prices.

Middle East: Kuwait recalls ambassador from Tehran

The row between Saudi Arabia-Iran still goes on. On Tuesday, Kuwait recalls their ambassador in Tehran. The Kuwaiti government said it was recalling its ambassador from the Iranian capital, describing the attacks as a “flagrant breach of international norms”.

It did not expel Tehran’s ambassador or downgrade diplomatic ties.

Conclusion: This is an apple polisher policy adopted by Kuwait and other Saudi allies.

Middle East: Saudi Arabia’s allies Bahrain, Sudan and UAE act against Iran

The row among Iran and Saudi Arabia has another chapter today. Saudi allies like Sudan and Bahrein has cut its ties with Iran while UAE has downgraded their diplomatic team.

Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir said trade links with Iran would be cut and air traffic links stopped.

But in an interview with Reuters news agency, Mr al-Jubeir also said Iranian pilgrims travelling to holy sites in Mecca and Medina would still be allowed to enter.

Meanwhile, Iran’s foreign ministry on Monday accused the Saudis of “continuing the policy of increasing tension and clashes in the region”.

Ministry spokesman Hossein Jaber Ansari said: “Saudi Arabia sees not only its interests but also its existence in pursuing crises and confrontations and attempts to resolve its internal problems by exporting them to the outside.”

He defended Iran’s response to the embassy attack, saying it had “acted in accordance with its obligations to control the broad wave of popular emotion”. Fifty arrests were made.

Iran’s First Vice-President, Eshaq Jahangiri, said it would be Saudi Arabia that lost out by severing ties, accusing it of “hasty and illogical actions”.

But in announcing the cut in ties, Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir accused Iran of having “distributed weapons and planted terrorist cells in the region”.

“Iran’s history is full of negative interference and hostility in Arab issues, and it is always accompanied by destruction,” he said.

Conclusion: Whom’s win the battle among Saudis and Iranians

World Affairs: Saudis announce Islamic anti-terrorism coalition

Islamic world faces terrorism. Now, Saudi Arabia and others 33 muslims countries launches a anti-terrorism coalition. A joint operations centre is to be established in the Saudi capital, Riyadh, state media reported. Mainly Shia nations like Syria, Iraq and Iran hasn’t invited for that.

Saudi Defence Minister Mohammed bin Salman said the new alliance would co-ordinate efforts against extremists in Iraq, Syria, Libya, Egypt and Afghanistan.

Speaking at a news conference in Riyadh, Prince Mohammed said the counter-terrorism force was borne out of “the Islamic world’s vigilance in fighting this disease [terrorism] which has damaged the Islamic world.

“Currently, every Muslim country is fighting terrorism individually… so co-ordinating efforts is very important.”

The coalition would not just focus on fighting IS, he added. Few other details have been given.

The list of 34 members: Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Benin, Chad, Comoros, Djibouti, Egypt, Gabon, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Morocco, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Palestinians, Qatar, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates and Yemen.

Conclusion: Iran is very angry with that alliance.

Syria: Saudis say Iran must accept Assad exit

The cold war between Saudi Arabia and Iran has another chapter today. In interview UK broadcaster BBC, Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir has said Iran must accept the removal of President Bashar al-Assad as part of any solution to the conflict in Syria. Jubeir told the BBC that there was “no doubt” Mr Assad had to go. “He will go either through a political process or he will be removed by force,” he said. It’s a first time Iran taken place on Syria talks. Conclusion: Saudi Arabia and his concerns with Iran.

World Affairs: UK pulls out of £5.9m Saudi jail deal

Saudi Arabia is a notorious country is fault of respect of human rights. On Tuesday, UK has decided to pull out of deal with Saudi goverment to training prison staff in a value of £5.9.

The PM’s official spokeswoman said it reflected the government’s decision to focus on domestic priorities.

The deal was to provide a “training needs analysis” for Saudi prison service staff.

No 10 stressed pulling out of the deal was unconnected to the case of expat Karl Andree, jailed in Saudi Arabia after being caught with homemade wine.

Conclusion: don’t make homemade wine in Saudi Arabia.